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Ingrid PEARSON

1992

IngridPearsonIngrid Pearson BMus (Hons), PhD, DipEd, LTCL, LMusA is Deputy Head of the Graduate School at the Royal College of Music (RCM), London. Born in Newcastle, Australia, Ingrid began her clarinet studies at Newcastle Conservatorium. Ingrid lived at Women’s College in 1992 and graduated from the University of Sydney with a Bachelor of Music Honours in performance and a Diploma of Education in music. In 1995 she travelled to the U.K. to undertake doctoral studies in performance practice at the University of Sheffield. She has performed as an historical clarinettist with the English Baroque Soloists, The English Concert, Gabrieli Consort and Players, The Hanover Band, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique and The Symphony of Harmony and Invention. Recent concerts include appearances at the BBC Proms, Lincoln Center Mostly Mozart Festival, The Barbican and Wigmore Hall. In addition to lecturing, supervising postgraduate students, and managing the doctoral program at RCM, Ingrid undertakes her own research activities, chiefly in the area of historical performance, as well as keeping up her rigorous performance schedule. “Working in a Conservatoire it’s important to be able to do both,” she says.

Ingrid is always keen to assist young Australian musicians who are aiming to study at RCM. “Most musicians who undertake study abroad are acknowledging that to reach one’s full potential, you have to test yourself on the international stage, both literally and metaphorically” she says. “Australia is a great place to study and indeed the musical experiences that profoundly shaped my life were those I encountered as an undergraduate. But for those of us who perform and study Western Art music, the UK/Europe is the place to be. I also feel quite strongly that it’s important to be realistic about the contribution you can make, which is more difficult when you’re a big fish in a small pond like Australia. Australian musicians, however, are widely respected in the UK and Europe. I came to the UK in October 1995 with not much more than four clarinets, a couple of scholarships, and a large amount of determination. Since that time I’ve been treated with nothing other than a high level of respect and have enjoyed working with some wonderful people. So, to summarise: Fortes fortuna adiuvat (fortune favours the brave)!”

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